nothing

Nothing is much more than a series of monologues. It is about – among other things – cupcakes, action films, crap television, shitting, sex, buses and stalking. It is about alienation and being young.

Barrel Organ's multi-award winning debut, Nothing, debuted at Warwick Arts Centre before success at the National Student Drama Festival. It then opened to great acclaim at Summerhall as part of the Edinburgh Fringe before a short run at Camden People's Theatre. The piece has been performed across the UK at venues including Paines Plough Roundabout and The Lyric, Hammersmith.


Initially written as eight monologues by Lulu Raczka (winner of the Sunday Times Young Playwriting Award), Nothing asks questions about the nature of theatre itself as performers improvise a new cut with every performance, each starting the show without knowing which particular monologue they will be performing on that occasion. Nothing is thus a game for both performer and audience, but it is also a serious interrogation of the structures within which we live.


Nothing | Production Photo
Nothing | Production Photo

People sat in a room all turned around and looking at one person

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Nothing | Production Photo
Nothing | Production Photo

A person standing and talking with their arms open

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Nothing | Production Photo
Nothing | Production Photo

A person looking into the distance with their arms folded

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Nothing | Production Photo
Nothing | Production Photo

People sat in a room all turned around and looking at one person

press to zoom
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written by

lulu raczka

directed by

ali pidsley


assistant director

jack perkins

co-made and performed by

joe boylan

bryony davies

rosie gray

dan hutton

euan kitson

kieran lucas

jack morning-newton

kate thorogood


The script for ‘Nothing’ can be bought from Bloomsbury here.


​“A snapshot of a generation who feels that the future has very little to offer them, and who are appalled and fascinated by the violence they encounter in everyday life”.

★★★★ Lyn Gardner, The Guardian